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20121027
20121104
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WUSA (CBS) 18
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the economy creates more jobs, but not enough. anthony mason on the final economic report before the election. >> we're four days away from a fresh start. >> we made real progress these past four years. >> reporter: a campaign 2012 report from bob schieffer. and "on the road." steve hartman with children of the storm. silver linings in a dark week. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. 110. that's the new death toll from hurricane sandy, and it's not likely to stop there. bodies are being found today in homes as rescue workers reach into the hardest-hit areas. the pictures that struck us today were of justice one family in staten island, new york. 14-year-old kate at her grandparent's house. her mother, julie, trying to pull something recognizable from the rubble. and sheila and dominick trayna holding on to their memories and contemplating the future. the insurance industry estimates economic losses from the storm at $50 billion. second only to hurricane katrina. more than three million homes and businesses are still without po
to the economy. that makes it the second most expensive storm in history after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's deaths happened on staten island. secretary of state janet napolitano will be there today. anna werner is there. >> reporter: good morning. homes are destroyed. the storm threw cars like toys. that's what it looks like all down this street yet many residents say they believe they've been ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten borough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we could have died! we couldn't breathe! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claiming their community has been ignored in the days following sandy while aid pours into other parts of new york and new jersey. >> a lot of people are here. a lot of people are hurting. so, it's upsetting. >> reporter: power is out. hundreds of homes have been destroyed and dozens of streets are impassable. still, the city is planning to go ahead with its annual marathon, which kicks off on staten island's verrazano bridge
the final weekend with events in wisconsin and ohio. >>> the last major snapshot of the economy before the election will be released today. the labor department will unveil the unemployment numbers this morning. economists are expected that will the economy will have added about 1 -- 125,000 jobs in october. which would be enough to get the unemployment rate to 7.9%. it will actually go up just one tenth of a percent. >>> military trucks will be used as election day polling stations in new jersey in communities that were battered by sandy. they're going to be parked at polling places that don't have power and also extending deadlines for mail-in ballots because of sandy. return them no later than the close of polls on tuesday. >>> early voters in maryland have been spending some of their time waiting in some pretty long lines. some sat in lines for 15, 20 minutes. others for hours. early voting hours in maryland have been extended through today and they will be open from 8:00 a.m. through 9:00 p.m. >>> a nationwide man hunt for a suspected bomber from northern virginia comes to an end
america that has a 21st century economy running on a 21st century foundation. >> schieffer: what happened to the women's vote? the prfs the way ahead. that seems to be closing. are you going to be able to get that back? >> i'm here in ohio. i just checked the early vote. the president is up almost two to one over mitt romney. and that's an indication that the field operation, the communication strategy, and the message of a resurgence of strengthening middle class is essential. and also the choice that women have to face on a host of issues from economic to health care issues that i think the president's message is right for them. if you look at the early votes in iowa, ohio, florida, the president's campaign is actually-- an investment that he made in the "get out of vote" effort identifying their voters is starting to pay off because they're beating all their numbers from '08. >> schieffer: we have to stop you there. the clock ran out. back with personal thoughts nay second. >> thanks, bob. born with. something you'r and inspires the things you choose to do. you do what you do... becaus
. >> reporter: the panera mom is educated, has children and is worried about the economy. and you can find her across northern virginia. >> i think a lot of women are looking for humanitarian issues and abortion rights and things like that. but i personally am looking for more business issues in this economy. >> reporter: they're women like virginia debole. >> i want her to be able to have social security and all of the supports of the economy. i want our country to be able to afford that. i just want her to have successful life. >> reporter: diane novinjer is concerned about health care and the future for 7-year-old ann marie. >> i want her to be able to get a job, buy a house, go to college, not struggle. >> reporter: it is the undecided panera moms that the candidates want and need. like zara safar. a mother of a 2-year-old. >> i'm real confused right now. last time four years ago was obama. now we still debating who it will be. >> reporter: this entire table of panera moms has already chosen their candidate, and their decision is split. the question now is which loudoun county will show up
actually have a plan to get this economy going. we're going to put it in place to help the american people. >> reporter: now, before the storm, rom niece actually leading the president on the questions of which candidate would be a stronger leader, and which one would be better at working with democrats and republicans. if he loses ground, scott, on either one of those questions, that could be a sign the storm hurt him. >> pelley: thanks, jan. the last report on the unemployment rate before the election will come out tomorrow. today, a new survey found that consumer confidence in the economy is the highest it's been in more than four and a half years. that's a sign that americans are in the mood to spend more, which could give the economy a boost. a family stranded in the suburbs, tries to get by without the basics. their story is next. hungry for the best? it's eb. want to give your family the very best in taste, freshness, and nutrition? it's eb. eggland's best. better taste. better nutrition. better eggs. but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] dayquil doesn't treat that. huh?
. >> reporter: the panera mom is educated, has children, and is worried about can economy and you can find her across northern virginia. >> i think a lot of women are looking for humanitarian issues, and you know, abortion rights and things like that you be i personally am looking for more business issues and economy. >> reporter: they're women like virginia, mother of 6-year-old gigi. >> like everybody else i want her to be able to have social security and all the supports of the economy. i want our -- our country to be able to afford that. so we need to recover. >> i just want her to have you know, successful life. >> reporter: diane is concerned about health care. and the future for 7-year-old ann marie. >> i want her to be able to get a job and i want her to be able to buy a house and go to college. not -- struggle. >> reporter: it is the undecided panera mom that the candidates want and need. like zara, mother of 2-year-old yusef. >> i'm honest i'm a little bit confused right now. four years ago was obama. now we're still debating who will it be. >> reporterthis entire table of panera mom
but is swinging toward mitt romney now. and we found the story of the economy in the death and life of asheboro. asheboro grew up on manufacturing, its factories filled with generations of families who built their town near purgatory mountain. but in 2008, asheboro was named one of america's fastest dying towns. the folks there were never going to quit, but they are still struggling. why are we stuck somewhere between recession and recovery? no one better to ask than those who live around purgatory. in randolph county, there's no escaping the second election since the great recession. nonstop, the tv promises a better day or warns of a worse one. folks around here have seen a lot of both. ( whistle blows ) those days start with the signature sound of asheboro at the acme-mccrary textile company. it opened the year that some of its workers helped put a republican in the white house, william howard taft. it was 1909. 103 years later, bill redding runs the place. at its peak, how many employees did you have? >> bill redding: about 2,000. >> pelley: and today? >> redding: 600. >> pelley: to see why
if they really help stimulate the economy. wusa and the washington guardian added up all the internal investigations at the department of energy, department of education, and 27 other federal agencies that spend stimulus money, finding more than .8 million had been misspent, lost to fraud, or questionable in other ways. our reviews on the program and spending on the american recovery reinvestment act indicates the numbers are likely to grow. investigators in the government agency that spent the money continue their audits and pursuing more than 1,900 open criminal investigations. for more specific examples like funds intended to aid the poor folks in rural areas, instead being paid for homes with swimming pools. check out our findings at wusa9.com. for 9 wants to know with the washington guardians. >> thank you, russ. the white house did not respond to requests for a comment, anita? >>> you can rip out that dictionary page that has the word landslide in it because it looks like we're not going to be needing it this time this year. polls show the popular vote for the president to be vi
. that's not how people decide whether they think the economy is good or bad. they do it on whether uncle charlie has a job or whether their kid finally has enough money to move out of the house and get his own apartment, things like that. so coming this close, we've been saying this was going to be very, very important, but this race is so close, i'm not sure in the end that it really is going to make all that much difference. >> as i understand you are going to have two key panels on this weekend's show to kind of break down the presidential election, the razor tight presidential election. >> yep. yeah, we're going to have every analyst, every commentator east of the mississippi river be with us sunday, and i hope they have a better idea who is going to win this thing than i do, because i'm at the point, lesli that i have no idea. this thing has been close from the start, but it has gotten really, really close here at the end. you look at the polls in these battleground states. i would goes, and i'm just going to put it at no more underlying of saying that it's just a guess, that probab
a v8. woooo! the economy needs manufacturing. machines, tools, people making stuff. companies have to invest in making things. infrastructure, construction, production. we need it now more than ever. chevron's putting more than $8 billion dollars back in the u.s. economy this year. in pipes, cement, steel, jobs, energy. we need to get the wheels turning. i'm proud of that. making real things... for real. ...that make a real difference. ♪ >> osgood: now a look at halloween by the numbers. a record 170 million people in this country say they plan to celebrate halloween this year according to a national retail federation survey. total halloween spending is projected to hit $8 billion. the average halloween consumer spending nearly $80, up from last year. more than 93% of children go trick or treating according to the national confectioners association. 63% of trick or treaters say chocolate is their favorite treat. followed by 9% favoring lollipops, 7% gummy candy, and 7% for those who favor bubble gum or chewing gum. as for the adults who hand out the treats, 41% confess that they
? the american consumer and american economy. >> we have an enormous trade surplus at our expense. >> mort, what is the answer? >> the fact is romney is right in this sense. they have consistently for decades kept their currency devalued in order to magnify their exports. sell them at cheaper prices. we have been protest that go for decades. when romney can do anything about that i don't know. but the real question is how do you deal in chin with this way without getting into a trade war which would be damaging to both sides? that is going to take real diplomacy and pressure with china. >> in a trade war, who wins mort? >> we do. we have a trade deficit with them of $300 billion a year. >> you can no more win a trade war than you can win an earthquake. everybody knows that. >> nobody will win in a trade war. but we've got to find some better way of balancing the trade. as pat says we have huge deficits in trade with china for decades and a good part of the reason is not because they have a very low wage cost including for a lot of american products but the fact is they keep their currency low to
to the sluggish global economy. next year they plan to open 600 new stores. this in the asia pacific region and just last month the company opened its first location in india. >>> and during the recession, that's about how many stores they closed about 600. i wonder how that juice business is doing? >> i have not heard updates on that. >> search for that. cool. >>> well, sandy caused a lot of devastation and there are people all over the coast who need your help. >> and here at wusa9 we are donating $1 to the american red cross, sandy relief fund, for every one of you who "like" us on facebook. it's a quick simple way you can help out. just click on like and we'll send a buck. keep it here with 9news now. >>> welcome back. southbound 95 or northbound 95, you have initially got delays as you leave the occoquan river through woodbridge and then again from lorton up to springfield. at least the lanes are open from 395 where it's beginning to bunch up as well from duke street to seminary road. back to you howard. >>> thanks. you know you want to start your day off right with a heart healthy bre
sandy, we could be seeing total damages, total losses to our economy up to $50 billion. $20 billion of that alone is just damage of property and things like that. then you have to factor into that economic output that's lost as a result of this. long-term we might see some recovery because of rebuilding. but we're live here at reagan national airport. people are starting to show up for flights and they're due out about 6:00 a.m. this morning. i'll send it back you to in the studio. >> thank you, jess. again, make sure you call your airline first before you head to the airport. >>> it is 5:12. early voting came to a halt during our some storm but it's resuming today with -- our superstorm but it's resume drag with conditions. >> an expert joins us with tips on safe trick or treating after the big storm. >> next at 5:15, howard looks beyond halloween to the weekend in the seven-day forecast. stay with us. . >>> good morning. welcome back to 9news now. 5:15. will the weather tonight be a trick or treat for the little goblins? >>it's going to be dry. how's that? >> all right. will they
larger economy? >> sure. early estimates are tough to get a handle on but it looks like there's something in the range of $20 billion just in property damage, lost business that could be anywhere from $10 to $30 billion as we sort through these things that just aren't happening right now because of the storm. think about it. from the empire state building to wall street, there's no electricity. that's a lot of economic activity that's just not happening right now. >> whenever you have these kinds of stories they say there's a silver lining. i think it's hard to see that when you're in the middle of this kind of devastation. do you see one? >> i hate to talk about such a thing after what you've been it true.on television. exhibit a.tion industry is thinabout it. ever since the great recessi there's been noson to bang na houses so there's no reason to build any more. now we have a reason to build some more house because a lot have been destroyed. 2 million construction jobs simply didn't come back after the housing bubble burst. now a few of those guys will get back to work. other industrie
that we still depend on 20th century technology to power 21st century economy. what does that mean. >> that's referring to the electrical grid. we saw what 8 million people who lost power. we have a system that isn't ready for this kind of a disaster. you have a grid that can go down easily. even smaller events like halloween's storm last year. we have a system that's like the internet, more flexible, more resilient you can get it back online faster. >> people can tweet but still couldn't use internet or cell phones. >> exactly. the signature moment of the storm people tweeting that they had lost power which shows that very clearly. >> what are the big lessons back to the cover story, a lesson from the storm that makes a difference in terms of the future? >> a few. climate change clearly is real. scientists will differ how much climate change affect as storm like this. this will become more and more common in the future we'll have stronger storms, we'll have these coastal flooding events which are disastrous with sandy. one thing we need to deal with. secondarily we have to think
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)